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DNR Reminds Citizens that Wildlife Belongs in the Wild

Small deer in the brush

Annapolis, Md. (March 19, 2012) ─ Each spring, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) receives numerous phone calls from citizens who have “rescued” a young, wild animal believed to be in jeopardy. Many people do not realize that removing an animal from its natural habitat almost always compromises its chance of survival and could potentially endanger someone. 

“Marylanders who come across young mammals should keep their distance and enjoy the moment,” said Paul Peditto, Director of Wildlife & Heritage Service. “It’s rare that wild animals abandon or orphan their young.”

Citizens are also encouraged to be alert for breeding birds, avoid disturbing them and never remove a nest with eggs. All native birds are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, which can be found at dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Plants_Wildlife/MBirdTreatyAct.asp.

DNR's Wildlife and Heritage Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have teamed up to assist with nuisance, injured or sick wildlife situations. To reach them, or to contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator, call 1-877-463-6497 toll-free or look up wildlife rehabilitators by county at  dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Plants_Wildlife/rehab.asp.

To learn more about Maryland’s wildlife visit dnr.state.md.us/wildlife or call the Wildlife & Heritage Service at 410-260-8540.


   March 19, 2012

Contact: Josh Davidsburg
410-260-8002 office I 410-507-7526 cell
jdavidsburg@dnr.state.md.us

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is the state agency responsible for providing natural and living resource-related services to citizens and visitors. DNR manages nearly one-half million acres of public lands and 17,000 miles of waterways, along with Maryland's forests, fisheries and wildlife for maximum environmental, economic and quality of life benefits. A national leader in land conservation, DNR-managed parks and natural, historic and cultural resources attract 11 million visitors annually. DNR is the lead agency in Maryland's effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay, the state's number one environmental priority. DNR is the lead agency in Maryland's effort to restore the Chesapeake Bay, the state's number one environmental priority. Learn more at www.dnr.maryland.gov