Fishing Report Overview Maryland Dept of Natural Resources
  DNR Home
Latest Update: May 13, 2009

Next Update: May 20, 2009 (By 5pm)


If you submitted a photo and don't see your picture in the regular report please look in the photo gallery that we periodically run. Click here for this week's gallery!


Overview

Striped BassMaryland fishermen finally received a break from the constant overcast skies and rain this past weekend and into today. According to the weatherman that is about to end and once again the long range forecast calls for intermittent rain for the rest of the week. Fishermen will make the most of it whether it is sunny or cloudy and hopefully none of us will have to do much fishing in the rain.

The trophy season for post-spawn striped bass is beginning to wind down as the bulk of the fish have left the Maryland section of the Chesapeake for their northward migration up the Atlantic Coast. There are still big fish out there to be caught and fishermen will be out there this week trying to catch “just one more” before it is all just a memory. A lot of wonderful memories were made these last couple of weeks of family and friends sharing in the joy of fishing. Donald Woodward was able to take out his 87-1/2-year old father Ross J. Woodward of Rockville and get him in position to catch this beautiful 41.5” striped bass off of North Beach. Don mentioned that he felt like he was able to pay his father back in some small way for the countless times his father took him on fishing trips as a child.

Beginning this Saturday May 16th fishermen will be able to keep striped bass under 28” in size and many will be putting out medium sized lures in their trolling spreads on Saturday. This new season opens up the type of striped bass fishing that has become the “bread and butter” of fishermen that carries them through the rest of the year until November. Fishermen will soon start to put the large parachutes and bucktails away and troll smaller offerings in shallower waters and near structure. Light tackle jigging is always a popular option along withStriped Bass casting towards shoreline structure and let us not forget live lining spot and perhaps chumming. Just perhaps we will have another excellent late fall season for large striped bass like we did last year; only time will tell. Until then we can all replay those visions in our memories of those huge beautiful striped bass coming to the boat and relive that magical connection to a raw piece of nature through a fishing line. The picture below was sent to us by Daniel O’Brian and places us all right there ring side as a big fish is brought to the boat.

The croaker fishing continues to improve this week in the lower bay region and to a lesser extent in the middle bay region. White perch fishing is a good option this week and many recreational crabbers are catching their first good catches of heavy crabs this week in the middle and lower bay regions.

The freshwater regions of the state are recovering this week from recent heavy rains and biologists report most trout waters are once again fishable. The fishing for smallmouth bass and walleye is excellent this week in Deep Creek Lake and largemouth bass fishing is also good in many of the states reservoirs, small lakes and ponds. Many of the tidal waters are showing the effects of runoff with stained waters and floating debris but post-spawn largemouth bass are being caught. John Mullican sent in this short video taken at Dam #4 on the upper Potomac showing the force of the flood waters. It will be a while before the river will be safe to fish.

Fishermen in the Ocean City area are finding good fishing for flounder in the back bay areas this week and very good tautog fishing around the Ocean City Inlet. Striped bass are also being caught inside the inlet at night by fishermen casting lures. Surf fishermen will see opportunities to catch large migrating striped bass greatly improve this week and the action should continue for a couple of weeks. The boats venturing out to the wreck sites off Ocean City are coming back to port with a mix of sea bass and large tautog.

 


Quote of the Week:

The two best times to fish is when it’s rainin’ and when it ain’t.

Patrick F. McManus



If you submitted a photo and don't see your picture in the regular report please look in the photo gallery that we periodically run. Click here for this week's gallery!


Click here for information concerning harmful algae blooms

Click here to view recent bay satellite images at mddnr.chesapeakebay.net/NASAimagery/EyesInTheSky.cfm.

A Couple of Closing Notes...

Don't hesitate to e-mail your recent fishing/crabbing photos and trip information. Send your photos via E-mail by the following Monday in order to be included in the next update. The file should be in .jpg format with the longest side sized at 600 pixels. Please try to keep the file size small, under one megabyte. The photo should clearly depict the angler(s), fish, and ethical handling practices. For information on ethical angling practices please reference the Catch and Release information located at URL: http://www.dnr.state.md.us/fisheries/articles/catch_release.html
Include the following information:

  • Date
  • Angler(s)
  • Hometown(s)
  • Photo credit
  • Location

  • Weight/length of catch

  • Bait/lure

Important Note: If anyone in your picture is under 18 years of age, we must have a photo release signed by that person and a parent/guardian before we can post your picture. By sending any photos or art to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources you are giving DNR permission to use the image(s) online and in print. You are also giving DNR permission to distribute the photo for non-commercial purposes to other media, print, digital and television for their use. You are not giving up your copyright, but are allowing the photo(s) to be used for educational and news purposes.

Send your photos and information to Keith Lockwood

Until next week,

Tight Lines,

Keith Lockwood
MD DNR Fisheries Service

The Fisheries Service is pleased to have you visit. We want to make this site as user friendly as possible, if you have any suggestions, please mail them to Paul Genovese.



Click down arrow to see links.

    Visit Maryland Online Email us with questions, comments, and suggestions
  © Copyright 1995-2008 Maryland Department of Natural Resources
1-877-620-8DNR (8367)
DNR Privacy Policy