Deer in Spring Landscape

Deer Fawn – FAQ

Photo of White-tailed Deer Fawn, courtesy of WJ Berg, USFWSI’ve found a deer fawn (baby deer), what should I do?

Under most circumstances, the best thing a person can do is to immediately leave the area to avoid creating any additional disturbance near the fawn. On rare occasions, a fawn may approach people or pets. If this occurs, the fawn should be gently coaxed to lay down by pressing on its shoulders as the doe would do to keep the fawn still. The fawn should stay put, providing an opportunity for people and pets to leave the area.

The fawn was alone, with no mother protecting it. It is so small and helpless and it doesn’t even move when I approach it. Does it need help?

No, the fawn does not need your help. The doe (adult female deer) will rarely be found near her fawn for the first few weeks of its life because her presence may attract predators. The fawn is well camouflaged and has very little odor, which helps it hide from predators. Fawns instinctively lie motionless when approached by a potential predator. This seemingly helpless state is a behavioral adaptation that has helped white-tailed deer survive for ages. Once the fawn grows stronger, it will follow the doe while she forages.

It looks hungry, should I feed it?

People should never feed anything to a fawn. Fawns have very specific nutritional requirements and improper nutrition will make the fawn sick and may lead to its death.

My children touched the fawn and I’m afraid the mother won’t take it back - what should I do?

The doe-fawn bond is very strong. A mother deer will not avoid her fawn if there are human or pet odors on it. Fawns are rarely abandoned, except in extreme cases where the fawn has defects which will prevent its survival. The fawn should be placed in or next to natural vegetation near the location where it was found to provide cover and protection. The doe will avoid the area until the disturbance has passed, after which she will search for the missing fawn. If more than 24 hours have passed, the fawn may need attention from a wildlife rehabilitator.

Can I keep it?

No. Removing deer from the wild and keeping them in captivity is against the law in Maryland. Furthermore, the unnatural conditions of life in captivity can lead to malnutrition, injury, and stress at the hands of a well-meaning captor. Wild animals that become accustomed to humans can pose health risks and become dangerous as they mature. Additional information on this topic can be found online at http://www.dnr.state.md.us/dnrnews/infocus/deer_policy.html.

The fawn is injured, what should I do? Who can I call?

Sometimes fawns are injured by pets, vehicles or farming equipment. Injured fawns should only receive care from a licensed Maryland wildlife rehabilitator who is authorized to handle fawns.
Fawn Rehabilitators will coordinate the transport and care of the fawn. You can get advice on what to do if you encounter an injured fawn, from a fawn rehabilitator. The following link provides access to contact information for wildlife rehabilitators who may be able to assist with fawn rehabilitation: http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Plants_Wildlife/rehab.asp

Where Can I Find Out More Information?

Additional information on what to do if someone encounters a fawn can be found on our website, Before “Rescuing” That White-tailed Fawn...Think Twice!

Photo of White-tailed Deer Doe, courtesy of Steve Hillebrand, USFWSSick or Injured Adult Deer

Rehabilitating an injured adult deer is prohibited due to the potential dangers to humans and the lack of success in trying to confine an adult deer for long term care. Deer can injure humans and should only be handled by professionals. If an injured adult deer is found and it cannot move off on its own, contact the local Police Department or DNR at 1-877-463-6497 for assistance.

Deer are susceptible to various diseases. Deer can recover from some diseases, though others can be fatal. Some deer diseases can affect humans, so people should not handle sick deer. All sick deer should be reported to DNR staff for humane euthanasia and testing to determine the cause of the disease. More information on deer diseases can be found online at http://dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife/hunt_trap/deer/disease/index.asp

Chronic Wasting Disease is a disease of deer, elk and moose which has been found in Allegany County, Maryland. It is spread from deer to deer through saliva, feces and direct contact with an infected animal or a diseased carcass. Special restrictions have been placed on hunters and landowners with respect to movement of carcass parts and feeding and baiting deer. Fawns cannot be rehabilitated in Allegany County due to fear of spreading the disease. Additional information on CWD can be found at http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Hunt_Trap/deer/disease/cwdinformation.asp.

To report nuisance, injured or sick wildlife
(Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm)
Call Toll-free in Maryland: 1-877-463-6497

For more information, please contact:

Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Wildlife and Heritage Service
Tawes State Office Building, E-1
Annapolis MD 21401
410-260-8540
Toll-free in Maryland: 1-877-620-8DNR, Ext. 8540

Acknowledgements:

Photo of White-tailed Deer Doe, courtesy of Steve Hillebrand, USFWS

Photo of White-tailed Deer Fawn, courtesy of W. J. Berg, USFWS